Editorial Feature

Project Loon from Google X: Solar Powered Balloons Allowing for Worldwide Web Access

By Kris Walker
 

A network of balloons that will travel 20km above the earth's surface giving internet access to remote areas.

The Internet has become a massive part of life with most people accessing it around the world. With the emergence of mobile technology, this coming year could see more mobile devices than human beings.

There are places in the world that can’t access the Internet and the global portal of information that it offers.

Designers for Google X aim to change this and aim to give the entire globe access to the Internet with their latest ‘Project Loon’ innovation.

Essentially, ‘Project Loon’ is a network of balloons that are enabled to connect people in areas where there is no Internet access. Travelling on the edge of space the balloons would be connected to something similar on the ground allowing for connectivity. What is interesting is that these balloons are powered by using renewable energy.

Project Loon: The Technology - Run Time: 4:00mins



Project Loon isn’t just an innovation that could bring the Internet to the masses; it can also be of great use in times of emergency.

Solar panels are placed between the inflatable section of the balloon and can produce up to 100 watts of power which is more than enough to both run the system and store energy. Combine this with the fact that the balloon moves with the wind; ‘Project Loon’ is a technology that operates using only renewable energy.
 

The balloons will connect with systems on the ground.

The inflatable section of the balloon is not to dissimilar to that of weather balloons however, they are made from polyethylene plastic, stand fifteen meters wide and are designed to be superpressure balloons allowing them to last longer than weather balloons. There is also a parachute attached for a controlled landing.

Project Loon isn’t just an innovation that could bring the Internet to the masses; it can also be of great use in times of emergency.

Project Loon could also be a benchmark for future technology that is powered only by renewable energy.

Be sure to like our AZoNetwork Facebook page and tell us what you think of this technology. You can also follow us on Twitter and ask any questions to our dedicated editorial team using the comments section below.

Image Credit: YouTube
Reference: Project Loon

Project Loon: New Zealand Pilot Test - Run Time: 1:32mins

Kris Walker

Written by

Kris Walker

Kris has a BA(hons) in Media & Performance from the University of Salford. Aside from overseeing the editorial and video teams, Kris can be found in far flung corners of the world capturing the story behind the science on behalf of our clients. Outside of work, Kris is finally seeing a return on 25 years of hurt supporting Manchester City.

Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Walker, Kris. (2017, July 24). Project Loon from Google X: Solar Powered Balloons Allowing for Worldwide Web Access. AZoCleantech. Retrieved on January 21, 2020 from https://www.azocleantech.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=431.

  • MLA

    Walker, Kris. "Project Loon from Google X: Solar Powered Balloons Allowing for Worldwide Web Access". AZoCleantech. 21 January 2020. <https://www.azocleantech.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=431>.

  • Chicago

    Walker, Kris. "Project Loon from Google X: Solar Powered Balloons Allowing for Worldwide Web Access". AZoCleantech. https://www.azocleantech.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=431. (accessed January 21, 2020).

  • Harvard

    Walker, Kris. 2017. Project Loon from Google X: Solar Powered Balloons Allowing for Worldwide Web Access. AZoCleantech, viewed 21 January 2020, https://www.azocleantech.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=431.

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this article?

Leave your feedback
Submit