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Results 1 - 10 of 144 for NOx
  • Supplier Profile
    We manufacture steam boilers, hot water boilers, thermal liquid heaters, indirect water heaters, low NOx burners, water softeners, feedwater return systems, feedwater deaerators, blowoff tanks,...
  • Supplier Profile
    AeriNOx is an environmental engineering company supplying cost-competitive and reliable emissions control solutions to the North American stationary engine market. Their focus is the reduction of...
  • Supplier Profile
    Georgia Power serves 2.25 million customers in 155 of Georgia's 159 counties. Georgia Power supports an array of environmental projects to make our air and water cleaner and our land more...
  • Supplier Profile
    Anguil Environmental Systems offers a complete range of air pollution control and water treatment technologies for manufacturing operations. On vapor combustion applications, Anguil is a global...
  • Supplier Profile
    Clean Diesel Technologies' areas of expertise cover a broad range of emission control technology covering both NOx and particulate matter reduction. CDT’s core competence is the innovation and...
  • Article - 7 Jan 2008
    An experimental gas turbine simulator equipped with an ultra low-emissions combustion technology has been tested successfully using pure hydrogen.
  • Article - 7 Jan 2008
    Using concentrated solar energy to reverse combustion, a research team from Sandia National Laboratories is building a prototype device intended to chemically “reenergize” carbon dioxide into carbon...
  • News - 8 Mar 2019
    A Japan-based research group headed by Kanazawa University has almost entirely removed SOx and NOx from diesel exhaust gas at a low temperature of 473 K by employing ozone from an atmospheric-pressure...
  • News - 25 Feb 2008
    The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc., a subsidiary of NYMEX Holdings, Inc., today announced that it will introduce the first slate of futures and options contracts as part of its Green Exchange...
  • Article - 23 Feb 2008
    A discovery in molecular chemistry may help remove a barrier to the widespread use of diesel and other fuel-efficient "lean burn" vehicle engines.